The Swamp Ghost of the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum


Zo893. One of 14 images of a WWII crashed B-17E on New Guinea, called the “Swamp Ghost”, salvaged by dedicated people and is now displayed at the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum with the air craft’s most interesting history made available to the visitors here in Pearl Harbor.
——————————————————-
As I said before, there is so much to see at the museum. The story of this aircraft impressed me right away. It is a large air plane, I never was that close before, the size impressed me. The history of this aircraft is amazing. The salvage of it, from a far, far wilderness and it ending up here in Pearl Harbor is incredible! My hat is off to all the dedicated people who made this possible!

On her first mission to bomb Rabaul, due to loss of fuel, being shot up, the crew landed the ship in the Agaiambo Swamp in New Guinea. The crew got out safely and continued flying later.

She was forgotten, and would not be rediscovered until 1972 when she was spotted by Australian Soldiers on a training exercise aboard an RAAF helicopter. The Aussies nicknamed her the “Swamp Ghost”, and so she’s been called ever since. It is not her historical name, but it is the name, history has given her.

The first 14 images are from me and my visit to the museum on the 25th July 2020.
The last 9 images are from the Pearl Harbor webpages, including their Facebook page. Click here for the URL:

——————————————

Zo894. One of 14 images of a WWII crashed B-17E on New Guinea, called the “Swamp Ghost”, salvaged by dedicated people and is now displayed at the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum with the air craft’s most interesting history made available to the visitors here in Pearl Harbor.

Zo895. One of 14 images of a WWII crashed B-17E on New Guinea, called the “Swamp Ghost”, salvaged by dedicated people and is now displayed at the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum with the air craft’s most interesting history made available to the visitors here in Pearl Harbor.

Zo896. One of 14 images of a WWII crashed B-17E on New Guinea, called the “Swamp Ghost”, salvaged by dedicated people and is now displayed at the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum with the air craft’s most interesting history made available to the visitors here in Pearl Harbor.

This picture is available to download in high resolution from my Flickr album with this URL, follow the download instruction for a larger resolution copy, click here:

Zo897. One of 14 images of a WWII crashed B-17E on New Guinea, called the “Swamp Ghost”, salvaged by dedicated people and is now displayed at the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum with the air craft’s most interesting history made available to the visitors here in Pearl Harbor.

Zo898. One of 14 images of a WWII crashed B-17E on New Guinea, called the “Swamp Ghost”, salvaged by dedicated people and is now displayed at the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum with the air craft’s most interesting history made available to the visitors here in Pearl Harbor.

This picture is available to download in high resolution from my Flickr album with this URL, follow the download instruction for a larger resolution copy, click here:

Zo899. One of 14 images of a WWII crashed B-17E on New Guinea, called the “Swamp Ghost”, salvaged by dedicated people and is now displayed at the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum with the air craft’s most interesting history made available to the visitors here in Pearl Harbor.

This picture is available to download in high resolution from my Flickr album with this URL, follow the download instruction for a larger resolution copy, click here:

Zo900. One of 14 images of a WWII crashed B-17E on New Guinea, called the “Swamp Ghost”, salvaged by dedicated people and is now displayed at the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum with the air craft’s most interesting history made available to the visitors here in Pearl Harbor.

Zo901. One of 14 images of a WWII crashed B-17E on New Guinea, called the “Swamp Ghost”, salvaged by dedicated people and is now displayed at the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum with the air craft’s most interesting history made available to the visitors here in Pearl Harbor.

Zo902. One of 14 images of a WWII crashed B-17E on New Guinea, called the “Swamp Ghost”, salvaged by dedicated people and is now displayed at the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum with the air craft’s most interesting history made available to the visitors here in Pearl Harbor.

This picture is available to download in high resolution from my Flickr album with this URL, follow the download instruction for a larger resolution copy, click here:

Zo903. One of 14 images of a WWII crashed B-17E on New Guinea, called the “Swamp Ghost”, salvaged by dedicated people and is now displayed at the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum with the air craft’s most interesting history made available to the visitors here in Pearl Harbor.

Zo904. One of 14 images of a WWII crashed B-17E on New Guinea, called the “Swamp Ghost”, salvaged by dedicated people and is now displayed at the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum with the air craft’s most interesting history made available to the visitors here in Pearl Harbor.

Zo905. One of 14 images of a WWII crashed B-17E on New Guinea, called the “Swamp Ghost”, salvaged by dedicated people and is now displayed at the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum with the air craft’s most interesting history made available to the visitors here in Pearl Harbor.

Zo906. One of 14 images of a WWII crashed B-17E on New Guinea, called the “Swamp Ghost”, salvaged by dedicated people and is now displayed at the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum with the air craft’s most interesting history made available to the visitors here in Pearl Harbor.

——————————————-
Here are now 9 images from the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum Facebook pages presented, click here for the Facebook URL:

The Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum also has this Blog entry, posted on the 6th of Aug. 2013: Boeing B-17E Flying Fortress Swamp Ghost (Pearl Harbor). This is the amazing and very interesting story about this air craft. I copied here only 3 paragraphs out of many. Click here for the URL Blog entry:

Captain Eaton steered 41-2446 southwest on heading 225 for Port Moresby, but several hours later, fuel gauges told him he couldn’t make it. With New Guinea’s looming Owen Stanley mountains dead ahead, and more than a hundred miles to go, he was approaching the coastal flatlands of Oro Province, and decided to make an emergency landing. He turned to a more southerly heading, and lined up for a wheels-up approach on what he thought was a large wheat field. It seemed smooth at first, but then came the distinctive thrap-rap-rapping noise of props bending back on impact. Then, chopped-up grass and foaming spray flying everywhere as 41-2446 sloshed and slewed to a halt on a final heading of 183 degrees. Captain Eaton had set her down safely in the middle of New Guinea’s chest-deep Agaiambo Swamp. The wheat turned out to be Imperata cylindrica; eight to ten foot tall swamp grass with silica crystals embedded in the leaves. The natives called it Kunai, the English speakers called it blade grass, because the leaves could slice you up like knife blades.

-Robert Greinert, Australian co-founder of Historic Aircraft Restoration Society was instrumental in getting the Papua New Guinea War Museum to issue a salvage permit to start the process. Once the Swamp Ghost Salvage Team arrived on site, they dismantled 41-2446 into wing, tail, engine and fuselage subassemblies. Ironically, the sections were airlifted out by a former cold war enemy aircraft, a 1960s vintage Soviet built Mikoyan Mi-8 helicopter! Code named “Hip” by NATO, the venerable chopper brought 41-2446’s parts to the coast of Oro Province, where they were loaded on a barge and towed to Bismarck Shipping in Lae.

-On June 11, 2010, Swamp Ghost’s fuselage was unveiled at the Reef Restaurant in Long Beach. The late David Tallichet was the restaurant’s founder; it was his success in the business which enabled him to pursue his passion of rescuing lost warbirds. His son David, along with Fred Hagen and three of the Swamp Ghost crew’s grown children attended the ceremony.
Swamp Ghost was not reassembled, and her fuselage was displayed temporarily at Chino California’s Planes of Fame Museum from December 2010 until January 2013.
—————————————————————

Zo907. One of 9 aviation museum images of a WWII crashed B-17E on New Guinea, called the “Swamp Ghost”, salvaged by dedicated people and is now displayed at the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum with the air craft’s most interesting history made available to the visitors here in Pearl Harbor. This picture is curtesy of the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum Facebook Photo Pages.

Zo908. One of 9 aviation museum images of a WWII crashed B-17E on New Guinea, called the “Swamp Ghost”, salvaged by dedicated people and is now displayed at the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum with the air craft’s most interesting history made available to the visitors here in Pearl Harbor. This picture is curtesy of the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum Facebook Photo Pages.

Zo909. One of 9 aviation museum images of a WWII crashed B-17E on New Guinea, called the “Swamp Ghost”, salvaged by dedicated people and is now displayed at the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum with the air craft’s most interesting history made available to the visitors here in Pearl Harbor. This picture is curtesy of the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum Facebook Photo Pages.

Zo910. One of 9 aviation museum images of a WWII crashed B-17E on New Guinea, called the “Swamp Ghost”, salvaged by dedicated people and is now displayed at the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum with the air craft’s most interesting history made available to the visitors here in Pearl Harbor. This picture is curtesy of the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum Facebook Photo Pages.

Zo911. One of 9 aviation museum images of a WWII crashed B-17E on New Guinea, called the “Swamp Ghost”, salvaged by dedicated people and is now displayed at the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum with the air craft’s most interesting history made available to the visitors here in Pearl Harbor. This picture is curtesy of the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum Facebook Photo Pages.

Zo912. One of 9 aviation museum images of a WWII crashed B-17E on New Guinea, called the “Swamp Ghost”, salvaged by dedicated people and is now displayed at the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum with the air craft’s most interesting history made available to the visitors here in Pearl Harbor. This picture is curtesy of the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum Facebook Photo Pages.

Zo913. One of 9 aviation museum images of a WWII crashed B-17E on New Guinea, called the “Swamp Ghost”, salvaged by dedicated people and is now displayed at the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum with the air craft’s most interesting history made available to the visitors here in Pearl Harbor. This picture is curtesy of the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum Facebook Photo Pages.

Zo914. One of 9 aviation museum images of a WWII crashed B-17E on New Guinea, called the “Swamp Ghost”, salvaged by dedicated people and is now displayed at the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum with the air craft’s most interesting history made available to the visitors here in Pearl Harbor. This picture is curtesy of the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum Facebook Photo Pages.

Zo915. One of 9 aviation museum images of a WWII crashed B-17E on New Guinea, called the “Swamp Ghost”, salvaged by dedicated people and is now displayed at the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum with the air craft’s most interesting history made available to the visitors here in Pearl Harbor. This picture is curtesy of the Pearl Harbor Aviation Museum Facebook Photo Pages.
———————————
Late entry to the Swamp Ghost album by Steve Spinaze

Zo916. Late entry to the Swamp Ghost album by Steve Spinaze
He responded and made a comet in the Facebook Group World War Pictures, at this URL, click here:

He had said: Oi! Don’t forget to mention me! I owned and flew the white thing. Ask Alfred Hagen.

——————————————–
One more picture about the Swamp Ghost salvage from Facebook.

Zo961. I forgot now what page it came from but it is a terrific picture of dedicated recovery work of a WWII air craft from a very inaccessible place in New Guinea.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *