Battery Ramsay

Battery Ramsay at Fort Mills on Corregidor Island.

Zc119. This is the Battery Ramsay area, this is the direction you enter it. If you look very hard to the right you can see part of #1 Gun blown up onto the parapet. This is an April 2010 photo but now it is grown over completely. CFI says they don’t have money to keep it clear of underbrush and trees.

Over the years I have made many pictures of this battery and make this presentation to share them!

Zc120. Now we are looking from the opposite direction, I am standing behind #3 gun and look at the entrance where I came from. This is also an April 2010 photo.

Zc121. This is where #2 gun of Battery Ramsey used to be. In 1945 the Magazine got blown up by US Bombs during the recapture of Corregidor and made this hole and buried the gun here under concrete. This is an April 2010 image.

Zc122. This is a section of the Fort Mills Map showing the location of Battery Ramsay on Corregidor Island.

Zc123. In March 2009 we had VIP visitors and we are standing around #3 gun of Battery Ramsay. From left to right, it is Peter Parson-son of a famous WWII warrior Chick Parsons, James Zobel he is archivist of the Gen MacArthur Memorial in Norfolk, Paul Whitman-webmaster of the famous Corregidor.org web pages, then, sorry, I forgot who the 4th Gentleman is.

The History of Battery Ramsay, Corregidor.org has two very interesting web pages!

Battery Ramsay History from Corregidor.org and it has more interesting links, click here!

Battery Ramsay web page with a war story from Corregidor.org, click here!

I copied here 5 paragraphs from the first link above:
Battery Ramsay was constructed between 1907 and 1911 at a cost of $99, 536 and named in honor of 1st Lt. Charles R. Ramsay, 21st U.S. Infantry, who died 13 July, 1901 of wounds received in action near Lipa, Batangas.

Armament was three 6-inch (152.4 mm) M1905 guns on M 1905 Disappearing Carriages. At a maximum firing elevation of 15 degrees these guns could fire a 105 lb (47.7 kg) shell propelled by a 37 lb (16.8 kg) bagged charge to slightly over 8 miles (12.9 km). Rate of fire was better than 2 rounds per minute, and field of fire was 220 degrees.

Facing roughly southeast into Manila Bay, the guns did not have sufficient range to reach the opposite shore so were unmanned and never fired in 1941-1942. Its magazines were used for ammunition storage and shelter for the men of the anti-aircraft Battery Hartford, which was emplaced in front of the battery.
In April 1942, Ramsay was damaged by heavy shelling from Bataan in an effort to put Hartford out of action. American POW’s subsequently stripped parts from Battery Morrison to restore the guns to service. In early 1945 its two magazines blew up when hit by American bombs, leaving two deep craters. The explosion blew No. 1 gun and carriage bodily out of the emplacement, No. 2 was demolished and covered by concrete at the bottom of a 25 foot (7.62 m) crater and No. 3 was damaged beyond repair.

Nos 1 and 3 guns and carriages only remain on site; No. 3 has since suffered at the hands of scrappers, who have stolen a sizeable proportion of the gun barrel. The spare barrel is also missing, whereabouts unknown, likely stolen by scrapper vermin.

Zc124. After you enter the Battery Ramsay area and immediately to the right we see #1 gun blown up onto the Parapet.
Here is a quote from the 2nd link above:
Battery. Ramsay survived the Japanese bombardment, but not the American aerial preparation. A direct hit consigned it to history, and few photos exist of its heyday.

Zc125. The lower portion of #1 Gun, Battery Ramsay is laying on top of the parapet after it blew up here in 1945 as a result from U.S. Bombing in preparation to liberate Ft. Mills on Corregidor Island. This is an April 2010 image.

Zc126. The lower portion of #1 Gun, Battery Ramsay is laying on top of the parapet after it blew up here in 1945 as a result from U.S. Bombing in preparation to liberate Ft. Mills on Corregidor Island. This is an April 2010 image.

Zc127. The lower portion of #1 Gun, Battery Ramsay is laying on top of the parapet after it blew up here in 1945 as a result from U.S. Bombing in preparation to liberate Ft. Mills on Corregidor Island. This is a Jan 2004 image. This is one of my first visits to Corregidor Island with the famous webmaster of Corregidor.org standing behind the gun.

Zc128. The gun barrel of #1 gun, Battery Ramsay is lying on the parapet after scrappers done their evil work. This is in the former Fort Mills on Corregidor Island and the scrapping happened after the U.S. turned over the Island to Philippine authority and before the Philippine Government made the island a historical shrine.

Zc129. No 2 Gun, Battery Ramsay is buried in the ground after the battery blew up in 1945.
Here is a quote from the first link above:
Facing roughly southeast into Manila Bay, the guns did not have sufficient range to reach the opposite shore so were unmanned and never fired in 1941-1942. Its magazines were used for ammunition storage and shelter for the men of the anti-aircraft Battery Hartford, which was emplaced in front of the battery. This is a 2010 image

Zc130. The #2 Gun of Battery Ramsay in Fort Mills on Corregidor Island got completely destroyed by the U.S. bombing in 1945 and is buried in the ground. This is a 2010 image.

Zc131. The #2 Gun of Battery Ramsay in Fort Mills on Corregidor Island got completely destroyed by the U.S. bombing in 1945 and is buried in the ground. This is a 2004 image

Zc132. This is all that is left in position, the base of one of the 6 Inch guns of Battery Ramsay in Fort Mills on Corregidor Island; it got completely destroyed by the U.S. bombing in 1945.This is 2010 image.

Zc133. This is all that is left in position, the base of one of the 6 Inch guns of Battery Ramsay in Fort Mills on Corregidor Island; it got completely destroyed by the U.S. bombing in 1945.This is 2010 image.

Zc134. This is #3 Gun of Battery Ramsay, Fort Mills on Corregidor Island; it is the most intact gun of the three 6 Inch gun at this battery. But the scrappers also were at work here, it almost looks like they got stopped. This is a 2010 image.

Zc135. This is part of the parapet around #3 Gun of Battery Ramsay, Fort Mills on Corregidor Island; it is the most intact gun of the three 6 Inch gun at this battery. This is a 2010 image.

Zc136. This is #3 Gun of Battery Ramsay, Fort Mills on Corregidor Island; it is the most intact gun of the three 6 Inch gun at this battery. Part of the parapet around #1 Gun of Battery Ramsay is still intact. This is a 2010 image.

Zc137. This is a Jan. 2004 image of #3 Gun of Battery Ramsay, Fort Mills on Corregidor Island. It was one of my early visits to Corregidor with the webmaster of corregidor.org. The other fellow is a retired Air Force Officer and son of a paratrooper with the 503d PIR.

Zc138. A rare look inside the carriage of a 6 Inch disappearing gun; this is #3 Gun of Battery Ramsay, Fort Mills on Corregidor Island; it is the most intact gun of the three 6 Inch gun at this battery. This is a 2010 image.

Zc139. A rare look inside the carriage of a 6 Inch disappearing gun; this is #3 Gun of Battery Ramsay, Fort Mills on Corregidor Island; it is the most intact gun of the three 6 Inch gun at this battery. This is a 2010 image.

Zc140. A rare look inside the carriage of a 6 Inch disappearing gun; this is #3 Gun of Battery Ramsay, Fort Mills on Corregidor Island; it is the most intact gun of the three 6 Inch gun at this battery. This is a 2010 image.

Zc141. A closer look of the operating mechanism of a 6 Inch disappearing gun; this is #3 Gun of Battery Ramsay, Fort Mills on Corregidor Island; it is the most intact gun of the three 6 Inch gun at this battery. This is a 2010 image.

Zc142. Many of the concrete pieces of the Battery Ramsay explosion in 1945 landed on top of the parapet. This is a 2010 image of the parapet area, Battery Ramsay, Fort Mills on Corregidor Island.

Zc143. This is a 2010 image of the parapet area, Battery Ramsay, Fort Mills on Corregidor Island. This is another large piece of concrete that landed on the parapet from the 1945 Battery Ramsay explosion.

Zc144. This is a large piece of concrete that landed on the parapet of Battery Ramsay and seems to be buried in the ground. I wonder, might that be the 10 ton piece described in the paragraph below; it is from the 2nd link above. This is a 2010 image.

On May 2, Battery Geary, 12-inch Seacoast Mortar Battery, was blown up due to the enemy artillery fire penetrating the powder magazines. Flying concrete from this explosion, landed in our battery position. One five hundred pound piece landed on a fox hole within the battery position, injuring one Pvt. Floyd E. Goode, to the extent that he died on the way to the Hospital. Another large block of about 10 tons landed between the director and height finder and buried itself level with the ground.

Zc145. This is a large piece of concrete that landed on the parapet of Battery Ramsay, Fort Mills on Corregidor Island. This is the same concrete block as in image # Zc143; notice the size of my bolo. This is a 2010 image.

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